Xmera / Dugdale Correspondence / Correspondents / Robert Wever

William Dugdale Correspondence

Robert Wever

Resident of Nantwich


Robert Wever, Nantwich to William Dugdale, Blyth Hall, 31 August 1664

'Sir, I have litle, but only to present my service to you and to give you many thankes for your last favours at Chester; I tould you of some pretenders to gentilitie who assume greate Noblemans Armes, both uppon Signets and paynted Escocheons, which I heare they, with many others, you made a returne to the Sheriffe of our County, and to the Clerk of the peace to be proclaymed and posted as you did the Cittizens of Chester, but none as yet executed, as I heare of. Sir, you were pleased to blemish some Armes in the Chuches of Chester, whereof one, that was hanged up at the funerall of Alderman Burroughs not longe since deceased, whereupon a friend of the said Aldermans meeting with me, the day you went out of Towne, (presuming I might find you at Namptwich) desired mee to move you, whether the table with the Armes might not continue and the Blemish taken of paying theire fees for entering the descent, and tyme given for proofe of the Armes'. He was given 25s to expedite this, but he was busy at the assizes and didn't get a chance to see Dugdale. Re. Sir Ewdard Minshull, who sent his man to Nantwich a day late to catch Dugdale: 'if you remember I tould you at Chester, that Sir Edward desired his excuse for not seeing you as then, in regard of some business and that he conceived hee was wronged because his Cozin Tho: Minshull of Erdswick had the Coate given him without a difference (at your first visitation at Midlewich) which was proper to him, and as I believe hee was soe possest by your old acquaintance Mr Geoffry Minshull (Sir Richard Minshulls Brother) which I thinke was deceaved'. He is inclined to believe Geoffrey Minshull's records, which accord in part with his own.

'Sir, if you doe not returne into our Country according to your resolves, when I last saw you, I desire to know what you will doe with Mr Borroughs .. I feare I have bene too troublesome, and if not much more trouble, I desire a line or two from you, if noe more, but to know you are well'.

College of Arms, Visitation Papers: Cheshire & Lancashire